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    An Experiment Simulating the Production, Capture, and Detection of 8Li from an ICF Implosion
    (Houghton University, 2022-10-17) Brown, Adam E.; Martin, Andrew L.; Yuly, Mark; McLean, James G.; Padalino, Stephen J.; Forrest, Chad J.; Sangster, Thomas C.; Regan, Sean P.
    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a possible tool for measuring light-ion nuclear cross sections. One way to do this might be to trap and detect the radioactive decays of the product nuclei produced using a doped target capsule. Some of the highest yield light-ion reactions that could be studied using this technique are 6Li(t,p) 8Li and 9Be(t,α) 8Li, both of which produce 8Li . In order to simulate this method, a natural lithium film was deposited onto a tungsten substrate, which was then activated via the 7Li(d,p) 8Li reaction using the SUNY Geneseo Pelletron accelerator. A current pulse of up to 1000 A was discharged through the tungsten raising its temperature to as high as about 1500 °C in less than a few milliseconds, causing the lithium to rapidly evaporate and produce a gas of neutral lithium atoms which then travelled outward and stuck to the aluminum getter detector foil of the Short-Lived Isotope Counting System (SLICS). This phoswich detector was used to identify beta particles and count in situ the 840 ms beta decay curve for 8Li as a function of time in order to estimate the efficiency of SLICS for trapping and detecting ICF reaction products. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and by SUNY Geneseo and Houghton University.
    64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Spokane, WA, October 17-21, 2022.
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    Depositing Lithium Films to Simulate ICF Reaction Products
    (Houghton University, 2022-10-17) Lei, Chunsun; Hotchkiss, Andrew; Martin, Andrew; Brown, Adam; Yuly, Mark; Mclean, James G.; Padalino, Stephen J.; Forrest, Chad J.; Sangster, Thomas C.; Regan, Sean P.
    A possible future experiment using Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) to measure low energy light ion nuclear cross sections has been simulated using the SUNY Geneseo Pelletron to activate a thin lithium target which was then rapidly evaporated, trapped, and detected. This experiment required a lithium film to be deposited in a vacuum of approximately 10 5 Torr onto the surface of a thin tungsten foil. The films were produced by heating natural lithium pellets to 400 C in a stainless steel boat through which 20 A of current was passed. The evaporated lithium was contained inside a stainless steel “house” inside the vacuum chamber, with a small opening on the top that allowed the lithium to reach the tungsten foil. The vacuum chamber was in an argon filled glove bag which allowed the films to be briefly removed and handled since lithium reacts vigorously with oxygen and water vapor. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and by SUNY Geneseo and Houghton University.
    64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Spokane, WA, October 17-21, 2022.
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    Background Rates Outside the OMEGA-60 Target Chamber Seconds to Minutes After a High-Yield Shot
    (Houghton College, 2022-04-27) Raymond, Steven; Kowalewski, Tyler; Yuly, Mark; Padalino, Stephen; Forrest, Chad J.; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean
    Inertial confinement fusion may be used to make fundamental nuclear science measurements of low-energy light-ion cross sections also of interest in astrophysics and fusion research. The feasibility of collecting and counting the beta decay of the reaction products (half-life 20 ms to 20 s) in the expanding neutral gas after the ICF shot is being studied using two types of “traps” – a getter and a turbopump. Both of these use phoswich detectors to identify beta particles and count the beta decays of the trapped product nuclei. One concern with this technique is that the background rate, even relatively long after the shot, may still be too high relative to the small number of detected product nuclei. An OMEGA ride-along experiment was performed to measure the background rates in these detectors from milliseconds to seconds after the laser shot. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and by SUNY Geneseo and Houghton College.
    OMEGA Laser User’s Group Meeting, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, April 27, 2022; 63rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Pittsburgh, PA, November 8-12, 2021.
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    An Experiment to Simulate Trapping and Detection of Radioactive Isotopes Produced in ICF Implosions
    (Houghton College, 2022-04-27) Christensen, Micah J.; Condie, Micah K.; Brown, Adam E.; Yuly, Mark; McLean, James G.; Padalino, Stephen J.; Forrest, Chad J.; Sangster, Thomas C.; Regan, Sean
    It may be possible to measure the low energy nuclear cross sections of light ion reactions by trapping the reaction products from an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion and detecting their beta decays. To test this idea, an “exploding wire” experiment was designed to simulate the expanding gas released in an ICF event. A copper plated tungsten foil was inserted into a vacuum chamber and activated with a deuteron beam via 65 Cu(d, p) 66 Cu. A current pulse through the tungsten then vaporized the copper to create an expanding radioactive gas, simulating the gas behavior in the ICF target chamber following the laser shot. Attempts were made to capture some gas and detect the 66 Cu beta decays using two trap designs, one using a getter and the other a turbopump. Both designs used the Short Lived Isotope Counting System (SLICS), consisting of plastic scintillator phoswich detectors and fast electronics, to identify and count the beta particles. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and by SUNY Geneseo and Houghton College.
    OMEGA Laser User’s Group Meeting, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, April 27, 2022; 63rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Pittsburgh, PA, November 8-12, 2021. XL Annual Rochester Symposium for Physics Students, University of Rochester, April 8, 2022
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    An Ambient Air Scanning Tunneling Microscope to Study the Surfaces of Thin Metal Films
    (Houghton College, 2022-04-08) Wilson, Joshua; Hoffman, Brandon
    XL Annual Rochester Symposium for Physics Students, University of Rochester, April 8, 2022.